Stew Glick

Stew Glick began working with Roshi Phillip Kapleau at the Rochester Zen Center around 1971. Soon after, Stew joined the staff of what would later become the first affiliate group of Rochester –  Sharon Springs Zen Center. In 1985 he moved to Rochester and began working closely with Toni Packer and came on her Zen Center staff in 1979. Stew played an instrumental role in the land search and initial construction for what would become Springwater Center. He spent over twenty years on staff as assistant administrator. He was one of several people whom Toni invited to continue the teaching work of the Center, and has led retreats since the mid-1990s. Stew left staff in 2008 to move to Rochester with his wife Lisa Schwartz. Sometime afterward, he began an informal weekly group for people to sit quietly and inquire together in the city. Some words from Stew give some flavor of his approach:

An important ingredient in meditative inquiry is this act of open listening. Listening, wondering and not knowing: this can all happen alone or together with like-minded people. Looking together with others has the opportunity wherein someone might point something out that we haven’t noticed or seen before. In the spirit of something Nisargadatta – an Indian teacher – once said, in an instance such as this . . .’What does it matter, who is who?!” What matters most is the looking itself – in which there is truly no ‘me’ and no ‘you’. Can we meet together in that spirit?”

Stew Glick

Stew Glick began working with Roshi Phillip Kapleau at the Rochester Zen Center around 1971. He later began working closely with Toni Packer and came on the Zen Center staff in 1979. Stew played an instrumental role in the land search and initial construction for what would become Springwater Center. He spent over twenty years on staff as assistant administrator. He was one of several people whom Toni invited to continue the teaching work of the Center, and has led retreats since the mid-1990s. Stew left staff in 2008 to move to Rochester with his wife Lisa Schwartz, and after a few of years he began an informal weekly group for people to sit quietly and inquire together in the city.
Some words from Stew give some flavor of his approach:

An important ingredient in meditative inquiry is this act of open listening. Listening, wondering and not knowing: this can all happen alone or together with like-minded people. Looking together with others has the opportunity wherein someone might point something out that we haven’t noticed or seen before. In the spirit of something Nisargadatta – an Indian teacher – once said, in an instance such as this . . .’What does it matter, who is who?!” What matters most is the looking itself – in which there is truly no ‘me’ and no ‘you’. Can we meet together in that spirit?”

Upcoming Retreats with Stew

Talks and Articles by Stew

Listen to a talk by Stew

“We are not the Conditioning: Image, Presence, Empathy” August 2018
“Should sitting be required on retreat? Attachment in Relationship” October 2018